Wednesday, 16 August 2017

5e: Hacking the Game, Fallout Part IX

Today's article continues the series hacking D&D 5e for games played in the wasteland setting of Fallout hack series. We're going to be discussing Skills and other Proficiencies. This is followed by a brief discussion of changes to make to existing feats, as well as a list of new feats.

If you're new to the series, check out the earlier articles here.

Lockpicking (Screenshot from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)


Skills and Tools

First, let's list out the skills that are available in a standard game of 5e D&D, organised by the ability score they're most frequently combined with.

For the purposes of this discussion, I have grouped Tool Proficiencies in with Skills as they are essentially the same thing other than the fact they require the presence of a tool to be used.

Strength

  • Athletics

Dexterity

  • Acrobatics
  • Sleight of Hand
  • Stealth

Intelligence

  • Arcana
  • History
  • Investigation
  • Nature
  • Religion

Wisdom

  • Animal Handling
  • Insight
  • Medicine
  • Perception
  • Survival

Charisma

  • Deception
  • Intimidation
  • Performance
  • Persuasion

Tool Proficiencies

  • Alchemist's Supplies
  • Brewer's Supplies
  • Calligrapher's Supplies
  • Carpenter's Tools
  • Cartographer's Tools
  • Cobbler's Tools
  • Carpenter's Tools
  • Cook's Utensils
  • Glassblower's Tools
  • Jeweler's Tools
  • Leatherworker's Tools
  • Mason's Tools
  • Navigator's Tools
  • Painter's Tools
  • Potter's Tools
  • Smith's Tools
  • Tinker's Tools
  • Thieves' Tools
  • Weaver's Tools
  • Woodcarver's Tools
  • Gaming Set: Dice Set, Playing Card Set
  • Musical Instrument: Bagpipe, Drum, Dulcimer, Flute, Lute, Lyre, Horn, Pan Flute, Shawm, Viol
  • Vehicles and Mounts: Land, Water


Skills to Exclude

What we find is that almost all of the skills are equally as useful in our post-apocalyptic Fallout game as they would be in a typical high fantasy. But a couple of the Intelligence-based skills are less appropriate.

The obvious stand-out is Arcana. Without magic, our game clearly doesn't need a skill themed around magical knowledge. Oh sure, there are a few supernatural oddities in the Fallout world, but nowhere near enough and certainly not well enough understood to justify the presence of a knowledge skill in the system. We can safely strike this one from the skill list.

The second I think we can get rid of is Religion. Certainly, pre-War religious beliefs are still upheld by some citizens of the wastes, and a few peculiar cults have also sprung up such as the Church of Atom and the Hubologists. Yet these faiths have a less direct bearing on events in the wastes than the religions of D&D have on its myriad worlds where gods are real and present powers. There are going to be few religion-themed puzzles, and no undead creatures for which it might act as a knowledge skill. The final nail in the coffin, to my mind, is that knowledge of all history is going to be somewhat spotty and even a successful knowledge roll made about pre-nuke America is not going to result in detailed specifics. Pre-war religions belong to that same vague and oft-misremembered history, so why not roll them into the History skill itself?


Skills to Introduce

Then what about skills that we need to add?
Characters in the Fallout universe need to be able to pick locks, but that's covered by Thieves' Tools proficiency. Thieves' Tools proficiency should also grants proficiency with bobby pins. Actual lockpicks is a very rare find in the post-nuclear world, so a typical set of thieves' tools includes a supply of bobby pins instead.
We can also add a Hacking skill for dealing with electronic security measures and reprogramming machines.
There is also room for a broad Science skill that would help characters decipher the purpose of machines, vault experiments, and other pre- and post-war technologies. Science might also impart knowledge about who developed a certain piece of technology - for instance, the character would know the difference between a RobCo component and one manufactured by General Atomics International. Similarly, methods of construction or clues in appearance might suggest a device was put together by an organisation such as the Brotherhood of Steel, the Enclave, or the Institute.


Tool Proficiencies

Tool Proficiences can mostly be left as is, though some could do with renaming. Instead of Alchemist's Tools, characters might be proficient in Chem Cook's Tools. Instead of Tinker's Tools, a character might become proficient in Mechanics' Tools.

A few other gaming sets might be available, such as chess or draughts.

More modern instruments such as guitars, pianos/keyboards, and drum kits should be available instrument proficiencies, but that doesn't need to rule out the existing ones. Characters may not benefit much from choosing an exotic and/or archaic instrument such as a Lyre, but instrument proficiencies are ultimately more about flavour than usefulness in any case. If a player wants their character to have mastered an obscure instrument, that's perfectly fine and could be an interesting aspect of their character to explore.

In the world of Fallout, aerial vehicles such as vertibirds and zeppelins exist. Air Vehicle proficiency should be available, though ought to be adequately supported by a character's background. For instance, they should likely be a member or former member of a well-funded and supplied organisation such as the Brotherhood of Steel or the Enclave.


Class Profiencies

Almost no changes need to be made to the skill and tool proficiencies of the classes that are appropriate for use (as discussed in back in Part 3). Hacking should be added to the Rogue's choice of skill proficiencies. Science doesn't particularly map to any class, though it can be taken by the magic-free variant bard I proposed since a bard can take any 3 skills. It doesn't need to be added to any class' skill list, because scientific expertise is better expressed by a character's background anyway. When we explore backgrounds (next week), there just need to be a few that grant Science proficiency.

Feats

Many feats from the Player's Handbook will work just fine. Only the magical feats should be excluded: Elemental Adept, Mage Slayer, Magic Initiate, Ritual Caster, Spell Sniper, Weapon Master.
The damage reduction from Heavy Armor master only applies if a character is wearing a complete set of heavy armour. At the DM's option, they can allow a heavy chest piece to reduce bludgeoning, piercing, and slashing damage by 1, and two heavy arm/leg pieces to do the same. Coverage of the chest and all four limbs would therefore add up to the full reduction of 3 damage per incoming attack.
A selection of new feats inspired by perks from the Fallout games follows.

Bloody Mess

You excel at targeting vulnerable points and causing deadly and typically messy damage.

Several of this feat's features require a target to make a saving throw. The DC is equal to 8 + your proficiency bonus + the ability bonus you used for the attack)
  • When you score a critical hit, double your ability bonus to the damage roll.
  • Whenever you attack a living creature and roll the maximum possible result on at least one of your weapon's damage dice, the target takes 1d4 damage at the beginning of each of its subsequent turns if it is not already suffering from this effect. The creature may make a Constitution saving throw at the end of each of its turns to end this effect.
  • Whenever you reduce a creature to 0 hit points and the damage is lethal, you can choose to dismember them in gory fashion. All hostile creatures within line of sight of both you and the target must succeed at a Wisdom saving throw or be frightened of you. An affected creature can repeat its saving throw at the end of each of its rounds. Once a creature has succeeded at its saving throw, it is immune to this effect for the next 24 hours.

Chem Resistant

Your constitution is naturally strong against the dangerous side-effects of chem abuse.
  • Increase your Constitution score by 1, to a maximum of 20.
  • You reduce by 5 the DC of saving throws against addiction.
  • You are immune to the Recovering Addict condition, and never need to make rolls against temptation to take or use a substance to which you were once addicted.

Devastating Allure

You possess great physical beauty and potent animal magnetism. Characters who possess devastating allure and use it to manipulate members of the opposite sex are sometimes referred to as Lady Killers or Black Widows, though in fact their appeal could be useful against people with a wide variety of gender identities.

  • Increase your Charisma score by 1, to a maximum of 20.
  • You have advantage on Charisma (Deception) and Charisma (Persuasion) checks made against anyone whom is attracted to members of your sex, and add +5 to the result of a Charisma (Performance) check against any member of the audience who is attracted to your sex.
  • You add 1d4 bonus damage to attacks made against any target whom is attracted to members of your sex.

Note that when an NPC's preference has not been predetermined, the DM may choose to do so randomly. While a gross oversimplification of the demographics of sexuality, here is one possible method rolled on a d12:
1-3: attraction to the same sex (homosexual).
4-5: attraction to the male and female sexes (bisexual).
6: attraction to all genders (pansexual).
7: attraction to multiple genders, but not all (polysexual).
8: attraction to non-binary persons (skoliosexual).
9: not attracted to anyone (asexual).
10-12: attracted to the opposite sex (heterosexual).

Ghoulish

You have become partially mutated in a similar fashion to a ghoul, and are resistant to radiation.
  • Increase your Constitution score by 1, to a maximum of 20.
  • You have advantage on saving throws against radiation poisoning.
  • You reduce damage that you take from a source of radiation by 3.

Gun Fu

In your hands guns are an extension of the body, and you wield them with the grace of a martial artist.

  • You ignore the loading quality of pipe guns, ballistic firearms, and energy firearms with which you are proficient.
  • When you miss a creature with a ranged weapon attack roll but the difference between your attack roll and their AC is 5 or less, you may move that creature to a free space withhin 5 feet of their current location.
  • Whenever you make ranged weapon attack rolls against two or more targets during the same turn and at least two of those attacks hit, deal an additional d4 damage to one of those targets.

Inspirational Presence

You are a person whose very presence comforts and instils confidence in those around you.
  • Increase your Charisma score by 1, to a maximum of 20.
  • You may spend your reaction to grant an ally within 30 feet of your location advantage on an attack roll or saving throw.

Lead Belly

Your digestive tract has adjusted to the radiation present in the wasteland's food and water.
  • Increase your Constitution score by 1, to a maximum of 20.
  • You do not suffer radiation poisoning from consumption of food and liquids.

Lone Wanderer

You are cunning or tough enough to survive the wastes, even when you can't rely on comrades to watch your back.
  • You gain temporary hit points equal to your Constitution or Intelligence bonus (whichever is highest) at the beginning of any turn in which you have no allied creatures within 30 feet of your location.

Miss Fortune

When your need is great, you are sometimes aided by an enigmatic and dangerous woman, who appears as if from nowhere and disappears as quickly. Is it always the same woman, tied to you by fate? Or do multiple women of the wastes find themselves drawn to your aid by a mysterious power?
  • Increase your Luck score by 1, to a maximum of 20. If the Luck ability score is not being used, you increase your Charisma score by 1 instead.
  • When you have fewer than half of your hit points, at the end of any of your turns in which the last creature you attack still has more than 0 hit points, there is a 30% chance that Miss Fortune appears, increasing by a further 10% on each subsequent roll until she appears.
Miss Fortune deals 1 piercing damage for each character level you possess to that creature and any other creatures within 30 feet of it. All targets who take damage from Miss Fortune must also make a Constitution saving throw with a DC equal to 8 + your proficiency + your Luck ability score bonus (or your Charisma ability score bonus if Luck is not being used). On a failed saving throw, their speed is halved and they cannot take bonus actions until the beginning of your next turn.

Once she appears, the Miss Fortune will not reappear again until after your next long rest. Miss Fortune and the Mysterious Stranger never appear at the same time: if you have both feats, you roll only once per turn to see if either of them will appear. Once your roll on the d100 is lower than the chance of an appearance, randomly determine which of the two appears. Afterwards, reset the probability of the second appearing to 30% for future rolls. 

Moving Target

You are always on the move, making it hard to target you.
  • Increase your Dexterity score by 1, to a maximum of 20.
  • When you take the Dodge action and move on the same turn, you are treated as though you have half cover until the beginning of your next turn. If you move behind actual cover, the degree of cover it provides is increased by one step.

Mysterious Stranger (Screenshot from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)

Mysterious Stranger

When your need is great, you are sometimes aided by an enigmatic and dangerous man, who appears as if from nowhere and disappears as quickly. Is it always the same man, tied to you by fate? Or do multiple men of the wastes find themselves drawn to your aid by a mysterious power?
  • Increase your Luck score by 1, to a maximum of 20. If the Luck ability score is not being used, you increase your Charisma score by 1 instead.
  • When you have fewer than half of your hit points, at the end of any of your turns in which the last creature you attack still has more than 0 hit points, there is a 30% chance that the Mysterious Stranger appears, increasing by a further 10% on each subsequent roll until he appears.
The Mysterious Stranger deals 1d4 piercing damage for each character level you posses to that creature.

Once he appears, the Mysterious Stranger will not reappear again until after your next long rest. The Mysterious Stranger and Miss Fortune never appear at the same time: if you have both feats, you roll only once per turn to see if either of them will appear. Once your roll on the d100 is lower than the chance of an appearance, randomly determine which of the two appears. Afterwards, reset the probability of the second appearing to 30% for future rolls. 

Pack Alpha

You take advantage of the distractions caused by your allies, striking when your enemies are most vulnerable.
  • Increase your Charisma score by 1, to a maximum of 20.
  • For every one of your allies that has already damaged a target since the end of your last turn, your own attacks against that target deal an additional point of damage.

Pyromaniac

You love fire, especially when you're the one lighting it.
  • You are proficient with any weapon that deals fire damage.
  • Whenever you hit with a weapon that deals fire damage, you deal 3 additional damage. Additionally, this bonus damage is unaffected by a target's fire resistance.

Scrounger

Through a combination of observation, experience, and sheer luck, you are adept at finding hidden stashes that others might miss.
  • Increase your Luck score by 1, to a maximum of 20. If the Luck ability score is not being used, you increase your Wisdom score by 1 instead.
  • Whenever you are present when your party discovers a supply of ammunition for any weapon type except for heavy weapons, you might find additional secret stashes. Roll 1d4-1 for every type of ammunition found for which you carry a compatible weapon. You gain that much ammo, which must be kept and used by you personally. The ammunition already in the stash can be divided between the party as normal.
  • Whenever you are present when your party finds one or more meals, drinks, and snacks, you might find additional sustenance, which must be kept and used by you personally. The food and drink already in the stash can be divided between the party as normal. Roll 1d12:
1-6: you find no additional food or drink.
7-8: you find an additional solid snack.
9-10: you find an additional liquid snack.
11: you find an additional meal.
12: you find an additional drink.

Next Time

That's skills and feats covered, and we're reaching the end of this series too! Next week: Backgrounds.

Sunday, 13 August 2017

Product Announcement: Significant update to Draconomicon: Dragonbound now live on DMsGuild

Based on feedback received since its release, my D&D Fifth Edition class the Dragonbound has received a significant overhaul. Version 2 features some major changes! If you've previously purchased the class or downloaded the Try Before You Buy version, please make sure to download the update from your account at www.dmsguild.com and please continue to feed back on this class if you have any thoughts on its design or balance. If this is your first time hearing about the class, a description follows.

“Up above the clouds, a high elf in thick layers and protective eyewear rides a silver dragon, a message cylinder that will affect the history of nations clipped securely to her belt. 

A brass dragon and her human companion plod across the scorched sands of the desert in the direction of an ancient ruin that legend says contains enough treasures to satisfy even their combined avarice. 

 A red dragon descends from the night sky, carrying a dragonborn of the very same hue. The dragon spits flame, igniting the fabric tents below, as both dragon and rider relish the screams of fear and pain from their enemies. 

Dragonbound are humanoids who, by tradition or chance, find their fates intrinsically intertwined with the destiny of a dragon. The two become partners, bound to a closeness exceeding even that of family by links of ritual and magic.”

If you're interested in playing a hero with a dragon companion, check it out here!

Wednesday, 9 August 2017

Product Announcements: Fist Fighters, Legendary Heroes, and Prognosticators Militant are live on DMs Guild!

Three D&D 5e archetypes previously published on this blog have now been prettied up and uploaded to DMsGuild! They have all been released as Pay What You Want. If you enjoy this blog, please consider purchasing any of these archetypes or my other DMsGuild products.

You can find them at the links below:

Fist Fighters (A Monk/Fighter Hybrid Archetype)

PURCHASE HERE.

"Fist fighters are unarmed specialists. Unlike monks, who channel the mysterious power of ki to attain unworldly abilities, they face and overcome the challenges of the world with nothing but sheer grit and clenched fists.

Fist fighters are most commonly found in underground arenas and seedy taverns throughout the world, plying their violent trade. But a few have loftier ambitions in mind. They take up adventuring to prove that their iron bodies are the match of magic, monsters, and the cold steel of weapon-wielding warriors. Foolhardy as such a quest may be, pure moxie can carry a fist fighter surprisingly far."


This hybrid archetype is selected at 1st level by a Monk, and requires you to multiclass into the Fighter. It capitalises on features from both class to create a Fighter who can hold their own in unarmed combat.

Legendary Heroes (A Fighter Archetype)

PURCHASE HERE.

"Legendary Heroes are warriors tied up in a great destiny, often to save the world and defeat a deadly evil.

Warriors first and foremost, legendary heroes are strong, steadfast, and bold. But their martial skill and dauntless spirit are not the only weapons at their disposal. They also inherit mysterious relics and powers, known as legendary gifts, which better equip them to face their destiny.

These champions are often fated to arise from birth, but can also become chosen after they knowingly or unwittingly satisfy the criteria of a prophecy. They might be chosen by gods or mysterious higher powers, or the inheritor of the strength and hopes of an ancient or advanced civilisation. A rare few are self-made, forging themselves into fated heroes through a combination of iron will and the rare fortune to stumble upon and prove themselves worthy of a legendary gift."


Prognosticators Militant (A Monk Archetype)

PURCHASE HERE.

"The Order of the Prognosticators Militant is a sect of warrior monks dedicated to the Red Knight that seeks out children with divinatory gifts. Typically such seers as the Order recruits are blind, the price they pay for their sight beyond sight.

In spite of their physical blindness, a Prognosticator Militant is far from helpless. They are taught to channel their divinatory powers to replace their eyes. In spite of their eyeless masks they flow gracefully through combat entirely unimpeded, a sight to instill fear in any foe."

5e: Hacking the Game—Fallout, Part VIII

This week continues the series hacking D&D 5e for games played in the wasteland setting of Fallout hack series. Last week we looked at armour and power armour. This week is the final post on the topic of equipment and possessions.

We'll start by talking about currency and salvage. Then we're going to be taking a little detour to discuss some new rules to support addiction. The item tables and properties will follow, starting with chems, for no better reason than it makes some sense for them to immediately follow upon the heels of the addiction rules. After chems come food and beverages, devices, and finally a d100 table of trinkets.

If you're new to this series, you can find an index of all previous entries in the series here.

The Value of a Thing

One man’s trash is another man’s treasure, and that has never been truer than it is in the wastelands of America. An explorer may not have much need for a sheet of scrap metal, but if she can carry it back to a settlement they will almost certainly pay handsomely given that they can put it to a number of uses including repairs or as a crafting material.

Meanwhile, a set of pool balls with the three, seven, and eight balls missing might seem like a complete waste of space in the wanderer’s pack, until he goes to a bar in the next town he visits and finds out the owner is trying to piece together a complete set for his pool table.

8 Ball (3D model from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)


An art piece or curio from the Old World is usually almost valueless when compared to a practical item like a gun, but might be worth a few coins to someone interested in improving the decor of their shack. But to the right eccentric collector, such as a Ghoul who misses her Old World luxuries, a painting, a china dog, or even a particular brand of gum might be of significant worth, even priceless.

The principal of suppy and demand is alive and well in the wasteland. The sale value of any item, or of salvage, may very depending on the wants and needs of a potential purchaser. By the same token, it may be far more difficult to purchase supplies such as food if there is no surplus relative to the locals’ own needs.

Currency

While there are no governments to legitimise money nor functioning mints in which to make it, the descendants of nuclear survivors have found it convenient to build an economy of sorts using a commonly found legacy of the past. The currency of the new world is based on bottlecaps—the precise brand of the beverage doesn't matter.

Nuka Cola Bottlecap (3D model from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)


Alternatives to Currency

While wasteland traders like to deal with bottlecaps for convenience it is perfectly possible to deal with them for a lifetime without ever touching a cap.

Almost every trader will accept other items in place of caps. A whole caste of wasteland scavengers essentially make their living salvaging the junk of Old World ruins and giving what they find to a trader partner in exchange for food, water, and other essentials. Some traders actually prefer to deal in object trades rather than caps. This is because raiders also appreciate the convenience of caps, so unless they are truly desperate for supplies they may not attack a caravan with a reputation for carrying no currency.

Some wastelanders also find that ammunition makes for a great trade item, and ammo exchange is such a common practice that it effectively functions as a secondary economy. Bullets are fairly portable, and in effect also have “denominations” given they can be traded by the box-full. They always have inherent value, too—there is literally no one in the wasteland who doesn’t need bullets, so traders will always happily take them off a wastelander’s hands. It is therefore common practice to exchange unneeded ammunition for useful ammunition, bottlecaps, or other equipment and supplies.

Characters and Caps

Either convert the starting caps for a character's class directly from gold pieces to caps or set a standard amount for all characters that seems reasonable to you.

A player may purchase any item their character can afford at character creation, but the DM is within their rights to restrict any item. Following character creation, items may be unavailable due to the scarcity we previously discussed in part 2.


Salvage

Some items are given values in caps. Everything else—items that you might consider useless “junk”—is abstracted into a resource known as salvage.

Salvage represents an average value and weight for the myriad junk items scavengers might pick up while exploring the wasteland.

The value of a piece of salvage is generally the same as the value of one cap. However, the value of a cap is always constant (either “one”, or on rare occasions “zero” if a character encounters someone who won’t accept caps). On the other hand the value of salvage can fluctuate depending on local supply and demand. When there is a great need for salvage, each piece may be worth 2 or more caps. Where salvage is common, characters may need to trade 2 or more pieces for every cap that is returned.

Salvage can also be used as a raw material when crafting items. Typically, a character requires an equivalent amount of salvage to the item’s cap cost in order to make it.

Existing Mundane Items

Many of the items listed in the Player's Handbook are available in the wasteland. Players and DMs should simply use their common sense. As a rule, you can purchase items from the Player's Handbook as though their price in gold was their price in caps. Remember that 1 cap is the minimum currency in the Fallout setting. Therefore, when purchasing items with a smaller price you have two choices: buy in bulk (eg. buy multiples of that item or any combination of lesser valued items that are worth up to 1 cap), or if you have no interest in bulk purchasing you can pay simply pay 1 cap as though you were overcharged by that merchant or allowed them to "keep the change".

Med-X (3D model from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)




Addiction

Back in part 2 when I first interrupted my originally planned schedule with new thoughts I'd previously failed to consider, I mentioned that I may have to do so again. As it turns out, I didn't think about chem addiction at all! That's a rather big thing to miss. Fortunately, this isn't quite big enough subject to necessitate an entire article, and I can address mechanics to deal with addiction in this sidebar.

The basis of the rules is this: Whenever a character consumes an addictive substance, they must make a saving throw using an ability and against a DC determined by the substance in question. On a failed saving throw, the character gain a level of addiction, which is one of two new conditions along with Recovering Addict (see below).

New Condition: Addiction

Abuse of many substances can lead to a special condition called addiction. Addiction is measured in three levels.

A character can have multiple addictions, each with its own addiction level.

Addiction Effects

Level
Effect
1 Disadvantage on ability checks while in withdrawal. +2 to the DC of saving throws against addiction to this substance.
2 Disadvantage on attack rolls and saving throws while in withdrawal. +5 to the DC of saving throws against addiction to this substance. +2 to the DC of saving throws to resist giving in to addiction while in withdrawal.
3 Speed halved and cannot concentrate while in withdrawal. +10 to the DC of saving throws against addiction to this substance. +5 to the DC of saving throws to resist giving in to addiction while in withdrawal.

If an already addicted creature suffers another effect or fails a saving throw that results in addiction, its current level of addiction increases by the amount specified in the effect's description. A creature suffers the effect of its current level of addiction as well as all lower levels.

While addicted, a creature may feed its addiction by regularly taking the substance to which it has become addicted. It must take the substance at least once every 24 hours to avoid the effects of withdrawal caused by its addiction levels.

If a creature chooses not to take the addictive substance, or cannot do so, it enters withdrawal and suffers the withdrawal effects for its addiction level for a period of 7 days, or until the creature takes the addictive substance. If the creature is in possession of the substance or in a position to acquire some, it must make a saving throw using the ability the original check against addiction and a DC equal to 12 plus the modifier associated with their current addiction level. On a failed save, the creature does everything it can to feed its addiction.

A creature that manages to go 7 full days of withdrawal without feeding its addiction loses all levels of addiction for that particular substance, and gains the Recovering Addict condition.

New Condition: Recovering Addict

A recovering addict no longer has a physiological need to imbibe the substance to which they were addicted, but it retains a powerful psychological hold.

For a period of time equal to 3d4 months after gaining this condition, the character must make a DC 12 Wisdom saving throw against temptation whenever they come into contact with the substance to which they were addicted. On a failed save, they acquire and make use of the substance if they have the opportunity to do so and if doing so will not put them in immediate danger. They may repeat their saving throw after each long rest, and they succeed automatically if the substance becomes inaccessible.

The character has disadvantage on their saving throw if they are under stressful circumstances.

The Recovering Addict condition is removed after the months are up, but an addict is never truly "cured"— the GM may call for a temptation roll at their discretion any time the former addict is suffering or recently suffered conditions of extreme stress. In the world of Fallout, "extreme stress" should entail more than physical pain or dangerous encounters. Grief and extreme and long term pressure are two possible stressors.


Buffout (3D model from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)

Chems

Item Type
Cost
Addictol 125 caps
Antibiotics 75 caps
Buffout 120 caps
Calmex 100 caps
Daddy-O 50 caps
Day Tripper 100 caps
Jet 100 caps
Med-X 200 caps
Mentats 120 caps
Psycho 70 caps
Rad-X 40 caps
RadAway 80 caps
Stimpak 40 caps
X-Cell 300 caps

Chem Properties

The following are chems (otherwise known as drugs and performance enhancers) available in the world of Fallout:

Addictol. Taking Addictol as an action reduces the level of all a character's addictions by 1 and suppresses the effects of withdrawal for 24 hours. Addictol is not an addictive substance.

Antibiotics. Taking antibiotics as an action ends the effects of all diseases currently suffered by a character. Antibiotics are not an addictive substance.

Buffout. Taking Buffout as an action increases a character's AC by and Strength or Dexterity-based damage rolls by +2, and grants advantage on Strength, Dexterity, or Constitution-based attack rolls, checks, and saving throws. It also grants temporary hit points to the target equal to twice their character level. The effects of Buffout last for one minute.

Calmex. Taking Calmex as an action increases a character's AC and Dexterity or Wisdom-based damage rolls by +2, and grants advantage on Dexterity and Wisdom-based attack rolls, checks, and saving throws. The effects of Calmex last for one minute.

Daddy-O. Taking Daddy-O increases a character's AC and Dexterity or Intelligence-based damage rolls by +2, and grants advantage on Dexterity and Intelligence-based attack rolls, checks, and saving throws. The character has a -2 penalty on Charisma-based damage rolls (to a minimum of 1), and disadvantage on Charisma-based attack rolls, checks, and saving throws. The effects of Daddy-O last for one minute.

Day Tripper. Taking Day Tripper as an action increases a character's Charisma-based damage rolls by +2, and grants advantage on Charisma-based attack rolls, checks, and saving throws. The character has a -2 penalty on Strength-based damage rolls (to a minimum of 1), and disadvantage on Strength-based attack rolls, checks, and saving throws. If the optional Luck ability is used, the character also temporarily increases their Luck by +4 (increasing their bonus by +2 and therefore effectively granting them two Luck points to spend before the effects of the Day Tripper expire). If not, the character gains two points of inspiration, which do not count against the normal inspiration maximum. The effects of Day Tripper last for one minute.

Jet. Taking Jet as an action increases a character's AC by +2, grants advantage on Dexterity saving throws, and gains an additional action on its turns to make a single attack, use an Object action, Dash, Disengage, or Hide. The effects of Jet last for 30 seconds (5 rounds), after which a wave of lethargy sweeps over the user, preventing it from moving or taking actions until after its next turn.
Med-X. Taking Med-X as an action grants resistance to all damage, cures the poisoned condition, and immediately ends any ongoing poison damage. The effects of Med-X last for 30 seconds (5 rounds).

Mentats. Taking Mentats as an action increases a character's Intelligence, Wisdom, and Charisma-based damage rolls by +2, and grants advantage on Intelligence, Wisdom, and Charisma-based attack rolls, checks, and saving throws. The effects of Mentats last for one minute.

Psycho. Taking Psycho as an action increases a character's damage rolls by +4 and grants 10 temporary hit points at the beginning of each of the user's turns. The effects of Psycho last for 30 seconds (5 rounds).

Rad-X. Taking Rad-X as an action grants radiation resistance for an hour. Rad-X is not an addictive substance.

RadAway. Taking RadAway as an action removes two levels of radiation sickness. RadAway is not an addictive substance.

Stimpak. Using a Stimpak as an action on a living creature restores 6d4 hit points. Stimpaks are not an addictive substance.

X-Cell. Taking X-Cell as an action increases a character's AC and all their damage rolls by +2, and grants advantage on all attack rolls, checks, and saving throws. If the optional Luck ability is used, the character also temporarily increases their Luck by +4 (increasing their bonus by +2 and therefore effectively granting them two Luck points to spend before the effects of the X-Cell expire). If not, the character gains two points of inspiration, which do not count against the normal inspiration maximum. The effects of X-Cell last for one minute.

X-Cell (3D model from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)


Food and Drinks

You might still remember that way back in part 2 I talked about using a somewhat abstracted system for food and drink. The system I proposed divided forms of sustenance into the following categories: meals (like a brahmin steak), solid snacks (such as Fancy Lads Snack Games), drinks (water and other beverages that are equally hydrating), and liquid snacks (like Nuka Cola). Meals and drinks prevent the effects of starvation and dehydration respectively, while snacks temporarily reduce exhaustion levels and can be consumed in quantity to substitute for a proper meal or drink in a pinch. In addition, all types of food and beverage can be irradiated (which is typical), or not be tainted by radiation.

Because the system is abstracted, the specific types of food and drink available don't differ mechanically. As such, the table below simply groups example types of food and drink into the appropriate category. At the DM's option, however, they can add mechanical effects to specific and rare types of food or beverage, such as Nuka Victory or Mirelurk Queen meat.

Alcohol

The below table also includes alcohol, the effect of which is described in alcohol's entry under Food and Beverage Properties, below.

Gwinnett Stout (3D model from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)



Meals, Drinks, and Snacks

Item Type
Cost
Examples
Irradiated Meal 2-12 caps depending on quality/rarity. BlamCo Mac & CheeseCram, Egg (Any Variety), Fruit/Vegetable (Any Variety), InstaMash, Meat (Any Variety), Pork n' Beans, Salisbury Steak, Yum Yum Deviled Eggs
Pure Meal 15-40 caps depending on quality/rarity. Fresh Carrot, Fresh Corn, Fresh Melon, Field Ration/MRE, Fresh Mutfruit, Institute Food Packet, Perfectly Preserved Pie, Preserved (Any Packaged Food)
Irradiated Solid Snack 1-5 caps depending on quality/rarity. Bubblegum, Dandy Boy Apples, Fancy Lads Snack Cakes, Gum Drops, Potato Crisps, Sugar Bombs
Pure Solid Snack 10-20 caps depending on quality/rarity. Preserved (Any Packaged Snack Food)
Irradiated Drink 2-12 caps depending on quality/rarity. Dirty Water
Pure Drink 15-40 caps depending on quality/rarity. Institute Bottled Water, Purified Water, Refreshing Beverage
Irradiated Liquid Snack 1-5 caps depending on quality/rarity. Nuka Cola (Any Variety), Vim, Sunset Sarsaparilla
Pure Liquid Snack 10-20 caps depending on quality/rarity. Ice Cold Soda (Any Variety)
Alcohol Varies Bobrov's Best Moonshine, Beer/Ale (Any Variety), Wine, Spirit (Any Variety)


Food and Beverage Properties

Alcohol. A character can consume a number of alcoholic drinks (bottles of bear/cider/alcopops, glasses of wine, shots of spirits, etc.) equal to their Constitution modifier without significant effect. For each subsequent drink, they must make a Constitution saving throw beginning at DC 10 and increasing by 2 with each additional drink after the first save.
  • On the first failed save, the character becomes drunk and suffer disadvantage on ability checks, attack rolls, and saving throws.
  • On the second failed save, the character's speed is halved.
  • On the third failed save, the character falls unconscious for 3d4 hours.
The effects of drunkenness end after a long rest or a minimum of 8 hours unconsciousness, after which the character makes a DC 10 Constitution saving throw, becoming hungover until their next short rest on a failed save. While hungover, a creature has disadvantage on its ability checks.

Irradiated Drink. Make a DC 10 Constitution saving throw at the beggining of the next day following the drink (or drinks), gaining a level of radiation poisoning on a failed save.

Imbibe 2-3 drinks per day to avoid dehydration.

Nuka Cola (3D model from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)


Irradiated Meal. Make a DC 10 Constitution saving throw at the beggining of the next day following the meal (or meals), gaining a level of radiation poisoning on a failed save.

Eat 2-3 meals per day to avoid starvation.

Irradiated Liquid Snack. A creature may drink a liquid snack to temporarily recover a step of Exhaustion. Moves one step along the Exhaustion track again at the end of the current encounter. You may only gain the benefit of one snack per encounter.

Make a DC 10 Constitution saving throw at the beggining of the next day following the snack (or snacks), gaining a level of radiation poisoning on a failed save.

A creature may imbibe 3 liquid snacks to substitute for a drink.

Irradiated Solid Snack. A creature may eat a solid snack to temporarily recover a step of Exhaustion. Moves one step along the Exhaustion track again at the end of the current encounter. You may only gain the benefit of one snack per encounter.

Make a DC 10 Constitution saving throw at the beggining of the next day following the snack (or snacks), gaining a level of radiation poisoning on a failed save.

A creature may eat 3 solid snacks to substitute for a meal.

Pure Drink. A creature must imbibe 2-3 drinks per day to avoid dehydration.

Pure Meal. A creature must eat 2-3 meals per day to avoid starvation.

Pork 'n' Beans (3D model from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)


Pure Liquid Snack. A creature may drink a liquid snack to temporarily recover a step of Exhaustion. Moves one step along the Exhaustion track again at the end of the current encounter. You may only gain the benefit of one snack per encounter.

A creature may imbibe 3 liquid snacks to substitute for a drink.

Pure Solid Snack. A creature may eat a solid snack to temporarily recover a step of Exhaustion. Moves one step along the Exhaustion track again at the end of the current encounter. You may only gain the benefit of one snack per encounter.

A creature may eat 3 solid snacks to substitute for a meal.

Fancy Lads Snack Cakes, Irradiated (left) and Pure (right) (3D models from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)



Devices

Item Type
Cost
Pip-Boy
Robot Repair Kit
40 caps
Stealth Boy
150 caps


RobCo Industries Pip-Boy 3000 Mk. IV (left) and Stealth Boy (right) (3D models from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)


Device Properties

Pip-Boy. Depending on the model, a Pip-Boy is either a handheld or wrist-mounted personal computer running RobCo's Unified Operating System. It is capable of playing holodisks, tracking personal notes, and displaying logs and local area maps that are transferred from other machines. The Pip-Boy can be interfaced with all RobCo Industries computer terminal and robots in order to program or hack them. The interface is also universal with almost all other computers and robots built by other corporations of the pre-War United States, with only a few exceptions (read: at the DM's discretion).

Robot Repair Kit. Using a Robot Repait Kit as an action on a robot or turret restores 6d4 hit points.

Stealth Boy. Using a Stealth Boy as an action grants the invisible condition for 30 seconds (5 rounds).

Fallout Trinkets

Use the following table to replace the trinkets table from the Player's Handbook.

Grognak the Barbarian Comics (3D models from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)



Trinkets

d100 Roll
Trinket
1
The shrunken head of a feral ghoul.
2
A slightly used bar of soap.
3
A charm made from a Deathclaw's knucklebone. 
4
A battered copy of an edition of one of the following magazines: Tumblers Today or Locksmith's Reader.
5
A silver locket engraved with the initials "AD".
6
A souvenir magnet of Nuka-Cola's Cappy mascot.
7
A crude map inked onto a strip of Super Mutant skin.
8
A battered copy of a The Unstoppables comic book.
9
A hand-written fan script for a radio play entitled "The Silver Shroud Versus The Lascivious Libertine".
10
A sealed pack of RobCo branded pre-War playing cards.
11
A metal toy soldier with chipped paint.
12
A collectible baseball with a faded and illegibile signature.
13
A battered copy of an edition of True Police Stories magazine. 
14
A teddy bear in a little labcoat.
15
A copy of the Blast Radius board game with three of the original player tokens missing.
16
A pair of plastic "X-Ray Specs", that don't seem to do the job advertised.
17
A necklace made of nightstalker fangs. 
18
A Las Vegas Snow Globe.
19
A grisly amulet made of mole rat teeth, claws, and whiskers.
20
A false eyeball on a neck chain. 
21
A fancy hairbrush with a pretty floral pattern painted gold.
22
A stoppered bottle containing dark yellow liquid and labelled "Yaou Guai Urine - Aphrodisiac". 
23
The antenna of a PDQ-88b Securitron.
24
A roll of undeveloped ProSnap camera film.
25
A battered copy of an edition of one of the following magazines: Live and Love or Meeting People.
26
A holodisk journal written entirely in code.
27
A battered copy of a Silver Shroud comic book. 
28
A heavily creased pre-War photograph of a ragdoll cat.
29
A flip-lighter featuring a Protectron design. 
30
A battered copy of an edition of one of the following weapons magazines: Guns and Bullets, Duck and Cover, Future Weapons Today, Milsurp Review, or the Patriot's Cookbook.
31
A leather belt made from Deathclaw hide. 
32
A tattered and doodle-covered copy of Lying, Congressional Style.
33
An empty Vault-Tec Lunchbox. 
34
A carefully folded copy of a pre-war news paper.
35
A Nuka-Cola bottlecap-shaped bottle opener on a key chain. 
36
A safe deposit key to a mystery box in a mystery bank. 
37
A Jangles the Moon Monkey plush toy, unevenly restitched in several places.
38
A broken holodisk. 
39
A well-thumbed pre-war tabloid paper. 
40
A slightly bent silver fork. 
41
A battered copy of an edition of Hot Rodder magazine.
42
A broken RobCo Sentry Bot collectible model
43
A well-preserved codebook written in Chinese.
44
A slightly chipped china teacup.
45
A battered copy of an edition of Dean's Electronics magazine. 
46
A Brotherhood of Steel Holotog belonging to someone called Paladin Cole.
47
A piece of a cazadore's wing, preserved in a wooden box. 
48
A flip-lighter featuring a patriotic American flag.
49
A tarnished silver dollar.
50
A battered copy of an Astoundingly Awesome Tales comic book.
51
A baby rattle with a demonic face drawn on with permanent marker.
52
A dented coffee tin containing radbat guano.
53
A heavily thumbed and blood-spattered copy of an edition of the Wasteland Survival Guide.
54
A battered copy of one of the following: the U.S Covert Operations Manual or the Chinese Army Special Ops Training Manual.
55
A heavily creased pre-War photograph of a Pekingese dog.
56
A child's plastic Nuka-Cola watch, faded pink. 
57
An ugly purple plastic toy alien. 
58
A King, Queen, and Rook from a chess set, all carved from ivory.
59
A battered copy of an edition of Total Hack, Programmer's Digest, or similar.
60
A Nuka-Cola branded big gulp cup. 
61
One page of a longer musical score. 
62
A battered copy of an edition of Picket Fences magazine. 
63
A tiny ship impossibly trapped in a 50cl whiskey bottle. 
64
A plastic baseball bat with the words "talking stick" scrawled on it in permanent marker.
65
A heavily thumbed and grease-stained copy of an edition of Takes of a Junktown Jerky Vendor. 
66
A dented and torn copy of Pugilism Illustrated.
67
A battered copy of a ¡La Fantoma! comic book.
68
A shot glass with a frosted Vault-Tec logo.
69
A battered copy of an edition of one of the following magazines: The Massachusetts Surgical Journal, The D.C. Journal of Internal Medicine, or Today's Physician.
70
A decorative bowl carved from a human skull cap bone.
71
A plush sloth toy with a torn leg.
72
A broken RobCo Protectron collectible model.
73
An empty box featuring a design of a young boy performing a nuclear experiment and labelled "U-238 Atomatoys Energy Laboratory Kit".
74
A stainless steel eyelash curler.
75
A battered copy of an edition of Boxing Times magazine. 
76
A necklace made from pieces of polished radstag horn. 
77
A small jar filled with powdered ghoul bone. 
78
A Nuka-lele brand ukulele, painted with a colourful atomic explosion and with two of its strings missing. 
79
A colourfully stained copy of The Big Book of Science.
80
A child's wooden letter block with the letters B & Y.
81
A battered copy of an edition of La Coiffe magazine. 
82
A creased pre-War photograph of an attractive redhead.
83
A sheet of Grognak the Barbarian water transfers. 
84
An Unstoppables Cereal plastic decoder ring. 
85
A battered copy of an edition of Tesla Science magazine.
86
A jar of powder made from abraxo and dried radscorpion venom gland, sold as a treatment for athlete's foot. 
87
A boiled and varnished Deathclaw egg painted silver.
88
A trifold American flag in a wooden case.
89
A flip-lighter featuring an Unstoppables design.
90
A battered copy of an edition of Taboo Tattoos magazine.
91
A pre-War postcard from "Wilma" to "June", wishing the latter were with her in the pictured paradise, somewhere called Hawaii.
92
A chipped wooden yo-yo.
93
A battered copy of an edition of Lad's Life magazine.
94
A pristine pack of pre-War cigarettes. 
95
The hemispherical cap of a mini nuke. 
96
A battered copy of a Grognak the Barbarian comic book.
97
The Player's Handbook of a pre-War game called Vaults and Vampires, with many of its more obscure rules highlighted and their pages marked with colour-coded tabs.
98
A Super Mutant femur carved with tribal markings. 
99
A giddyup buttercup's front left leg.
100
An empty chemical canister marked "F.E.V."

Toy Alien (3D model from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)


Next Time

That's it for equipment! Next week, we'll be taking a look at Skills and Feats.

Over to You

What do you think of the rules for the abstract rules for salvage, food and drink? What about chems and addiction? How about the new trinkets table? Let me know in the comments, or message me on twitter (@spilledale).

Wednesday, 2 August 2017

5e: Hacking the Game—Fallout, Part VII

It's time for another foray into the world of Fallout with our ongoing D&D 5e hacking project. If this is your first time jumping into this series, you may want to take a look at past articles. You can find an index of them here.

We started off our discussion of equipment a few weeks back with weapons and other damaging things, which is not quite the order the Player's Handbook would suggest I should have done it. If I were following that as a template I would have started with currency and armour. But I wanted to open the equipment articles with something punchier (excuse the pun). Not only are weapons arguably the most important tools at character's disposals in a game so reliant on conflict, they are also the most complex and rules-crunchy part of the inventory. Even more so with the addition of the modification subsystem I introduced. Last week we concluded that part of our journey. Instead we move on to parts of the equipment list that are perhaps not as exciting, but no less important. Next up is armour.

Armour may not be as flashy as weaponry, but all the same no wastelander should be without it. It's the means by which you stop all those exciting weapons carried by raiders, mercenaries, and super mutants from immediately obliterating you. Player characters especially should equip themselves with the best they can afford, since quite a lot of the weapons available in the setting exceed (sometimes by a lot) the base damage of weaponry available in the core D&D game. The importance of Armour Class as a stat is further magnifed by the lack of magic. Why? Because there will be less save-based effects, and thus enemies are more likely to be making attack rolls.

Magic not being a feature of the game also means that there are less ways for a character to raise their AC. Given we know that AC will matter to our wasteland heroes a lot because of the reasons addressed in the previous paragraph, we should consider making it possible for armour to increase AC beyond the limits of the core 5th edition game. Not easily nor cheaply, but doably.

And then there's the issue of power armour... Well, more on that later.

Vault-Tec Security Armour [Light Armour] (Screenshot from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)

Armour Rules Complexity and You

At the beginning of this series, I discussed how I planned to hack the game making as few changes as possible and building new things only when we need them. Along the way, I've mostly stuck to that goal. But sometimes, changes—even very big changes—are necessary not because they are required for the game to function but because they are essential for capturing the spirit of the world we're trying to build a hack to support. Weaponry has been the biggest example of such change so far, with my throwing out the Player's Handbook table in favour of creating custom weapons tables, and building a modification subsystem. I think this was an essential choice. As just one example of why I felt this necessary, the ranged weapons of Fallout are too different, and also too varied, to be adequately captured by reskinning a handful of crossbow and bow variants. The result would have been exceedingly dull. As for the new modifications subsystem? Granted, modifications were only introduced to the Fallout series in the most recent game, but they are a cool and iconic feature, and also do a great deal to support the scavenger spirit and hodge-podge tinkering of the wasteland setting we're creating these rules for. The beauty is that the PHB table is still there and still compatible with the rules. You could still refer to it for examples or exotic and archaic weapons.

Do we need to embrace such extensive changes when we work on rules for armour? I would argue yes. And so that's exactly what I'll do. But I want to acknowledge upfront that in the case of armour this is a decision I would make solely as a question of theme, rather than necessarily mechanical necessity. For one, I'm trying to build rules that constantly reinforce that scarcity is a GM tool in this world, so I would like rules where it is rare to find armour in complete sets. Second, I would like to build an armour modification subsystem that is functionally similar to the one for weapons. For your game, you might decide that involved armour rules are one complexity too many. If that's the case, you can skip all the way to the section at the bottom of the article entitled Simple Armour Option.

Armour and Scarcity

I just mentioned that it should be rare to find armour in complete sets. In vanilla 5th edition, the assumption is that armour is always sold or found in complete sets, and the implication is that the AC value and other effects of the armour apply when the entire set is equipped.

If we want to embrace the underlying theme of scarcity in our armour rules, we need a solution where whatever scraps of armour a character finds and is able to equip do benefit them in some shape or form. What we need to build is a system for "piecemeal armour".

The first step in establishing a system for piecemeal armour is to figure out how many pieces of armour a person can wear. In reality, the answer to that is quite a lot. In medieval plate armour, for instance, there were over twenty individual pieces. We don't want nor need that level of complexity, so I propose to break a humanoid body up into a number of slots: chest (for breastplates and jackets), left arm (for shoulder pads and bracers), right arm, left leg (for greaves and boots), right leg, and finally a slot for a helmet. Naturally, a character can only benefit from one item in each slot at a time.

Fallout 4 also has additional clothing slots: Eyes (glasses and goggles), mouth (bandanas and similar), and a body slot in which a character can wear regular clothing underneath the bits of armour they find. The items worn in them aren't armour, strictly speaking. In the video game some of them are just cosmetic while others are found with enhancements or can be modified to have armour-like properties, but they are an exception. Therefore I don't think we need to build in default support for them. Special items that provide armour-like benefits without taking up an armour slot can be handed out by a GM as special exceptions in a similar fashion to magic items in the core rules of D&D. So for now at least we're concerned with the Helmet, Chest, Arms, and Legs slots.

Aside from armour slots, I think we should retain the three categories of armour: light, medium, and heavy. These will be a useful tool in establishing the difference between weaker and stronger pieces of armour. Furthermore, by keeping them we don't have to think about how changing this part of the rules plays with class proficiencies. In actual fact, I think it's probably a good idea to abstract the armour a bit and simply use these three categories rather than break armour up into all the various types available in Fallout (leather, raider, metal, etc.). The modification system will be quite complicated enough as it is without thinking about the interplay with specific armour types. That said, the GM can and should specify what a piece of armour is made of when it is found or available for sale, and could rule that it has special properties or weaknesses.

We will also have to think about the interplay of wearing pieces of armour from different categories.

Breaking Down AC

To achieve what we want, we need to figure out how to break up the AC of Light, Medium, and Heavy armour so that the benefits of AC are granted incrementally the more pieces of armour a character wears.

Light Armour


Leather Armour [Light Armour] (Screenshot from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)


Using studded leather as our reference, we know that light armour should be worth an AC of 12 (or a bonus of +2). But we also know that we can afford to let the AC of light armour in our rules rise a little higher, due to the dangerous weapons available. 13 or 14, perhaps, without factoring in modifications? Here are my thoughts on how to divide this up:
  • Light Arms/Legs: +1 AC per 4 pieces worn.
  • Light Chest: +1 AC.
  • Helmet: +1 AC.
With this, a character's AC will be 11 if they wear light arm and leg armour, 12 if they also have chest armour, and 13 if they also wear a helmet. Modifications to their armour and helmet will let them increase this number higher, as would carrying a shield.

Note that the modification subsystem will let characters add useful properties to each piece of armour, making it useful for its own reasons even when it's only worth a fraction of an AC bonus.

Medium Armour


Raider Armour [Medium Armour] (Screenshot from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)


With half-plate as our reference, we know that the total bonus of medium armour should be around 15. We've also already created a useful model. If it takes 4 light leg/arm pieces to grant a +1 bonus, what if 2 medium leg/arm pieces grant +1 bonus for a total of +2 if all four are worn? Medium armour could be broken up something like this:
  • Light Arms/Legs: +1 AC per 2 pieces worn.
  • Light Chest: +3 AC.
  • Helmet: +1 AC. (I should note at this point that helmets are always treated as Light armour that grant +1 AC (similar to the static +2 of shields). A Heavy modification for the helmet would increase the bonus to +2.
Without modifications, a character wearing medium armour has an AC of 12 if they wear all the arm and leg pieces, 15 if they also have chest armour, and 16 if they're wearing a helmet.

Heavy Armour


Sturdy Combat Armour [Heavy Armour] (Screenshot from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)


Finally, we can compare heavy armout to plate, so we know the total bonus must be at least +8, but likely a little better since that's consistent with what we've developed so far. We can also continue doubling the effect of leg and arm pieces, so this time each one will be worth +1 AC by itself. Here's what I'm thinking:
  • Light Arms/Legs: +1 AC per piece worn.
  • Light Chest: +4 AC.
  • Helmet: +1 AC.
Without modifications, a character wearing heavy armour has an AC of 14 if they wear all the arm and leg pieces, 18 if they also have chest armour, and 19 if they're wearing a helmet.

All in all, I think this approach works well. There is an internal logic to the incremental improvements of the armour, and with each category we've managed to attain an AC for a complete set that is one higher than the AC available from the armours listed in the Player's Handbook. There's a nice sense of symmetry here.

We still might want characters to be able to boost their AC higher, but we can accomplish that through modifications.

Odd Armour Combinations

What happens when a characer wears a mix of light, medium, and heavy armour?

Any armour that grants at least a +1 bonus to AC has an effect that is obvious even when armour is piecemeal, so needs no special rules. That eliminates chest pieces and all heavy armour from consideration.

The fact that two pieces of light arm and leg armour is equivalent to one piece of medium arm or leg armour is fairly obvious and forms the basis of an equivalency system.

Dexterity Penalties

In the base game, medium and heavy armours prohibit the use of some or all of a character's Dexterity bonus. Because of the piecemeal armour system, we need to approach this from the other direction and apply penalties to the character's maximum allowed Dexterity bonus based on the armour pieces they're wearing.

Power Armour


T-60 Power (Screenshot from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)


How to handle power armour? It could simply be treated as armour with ludicrously high AC, but that would lead to fairly dull encounters. It should also be possible to damage power armour so that, over time, its benefits are lost.

If we want to track the power armour's health, that suggests that it should be treated as a pool of hit points that acts as a buffer before the character's own hit points are lost.

In keeping with the idea of piecemeal armour, power armour has the same six slots as regular armour. Each piece of power armour has a certain number of hit points; when it runs out of hit points, the damage just carries over to the next piece or to the wearer if there are no pieces remaining. We need a method of deciding which pieces are targeted in which order: I propose Arms (starting with the one with the least current hit points, or randomly determining if both have the same maximum hit points and neither is damaged), Legs (the same rules apply), Chest, Helmet.

Power armour frames also increase a character's strength and reduce falling damage. Power armour can also allow a character to breathe underwater for a limited time. These features need to be accounted for in the rules created to handle power armour.

Power armour frames can be worn by medium humanoids.

Modifications

Just as weapons did, both armour and power armour will have a modifications system. Almost all modifications for power armour will be separate from those available to regular armour. Armour modifications are generally available for Light, Medium, and Heavy armours.

Modifications are broken up into Material modifications (which can be applied to armour of any of the slots except helmets), Arm modifications, Chest modifications, Helmet modifications, and Leg modifications.

Robots, Armour, and Modifications

Robot characters can't be unfairly penalised, thus they can wear armour. When armour is purchased and equipped on a robot, it generally means that defensive upgrades have been installed in their systems or extra plating has been bolted on to their frame. Robots have six armour slots even when they don't have the traditional humanoid body, and even when the robot does have an unusual body (like an eyebot) the slots have complete equivalency. Eg. four slots are "arm/leg" slots and thus may only grant fractional AC, etc. On the whole a robot should be capable of installing most mods, but common sense should apply.

Because of their body shapes I think we have to exclude robots from wearing power armour, but they have access to unique modifications that represent hardware and system upgrades. In some cases, robots have access to modifications otherwise only available for power armour.

Actual Rules

All right, enough discussion! Let's get on to the crunchy bits.

Armour Categories

Light armour is made from supple and thin materials, such as leather.

Although typically worn by wanderers who cannot afford better, agile characters may prefer light armour due to the fact it can be worn without sacrificing any mobility. A character can apply their full Dexterity bonus while wearing light armour. Therefore a full set of light armour is likely an optimal choice for a character with a high Dexterity bonus.

Two pieces of light arm or leg armour are treated as one piece of medium arm or leg armour (see Piecemeal Armour, below).


DC Guard/Baseball Armour [Light Armour] (Screenshot from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)

Medium armour offers more protection than light armour, but impairs movement more. Medium armour includes metal armour, combat armour, and armour made from the frames of old robots.

The amount of a character’s Dexterity bonus they can apply to their AC may be reduced by wearing some pieces of medium armour. A full set of medium armour is therefore a decent choice for a character with no Dexterity bonus or a Dexterity penalty, and an optimal choice for a character with only a small Dexterity bonus.

A piece of medium arm or leg armour is treated as two pieces of light arm or leg armour (see Piecemeal Armour, below).


Metal Armour [Medium Armour] (Screenshot from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)

Heavy armour offers the best protection but is bulky and far less mobile. Heavy armour is generally made from similar base materials to medium armour. It represents heavy variants of pre-nuclear combat armour as well as bulkier, tougher armours made from scrap metal and robot parts.

The amount of a character’s Dexterity bonus they can apply to their AC is reduced by every piece of heavy armour worn. A full set of heavy armour is therefore the optimal choice for a character with no Dexterity bonus or a Dexterity penalty.


Sturdy Raider Armour [Light Armour] (Screenshot from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)

Helmets are usually made of metal, fiberglass, or some similarly stiff and durable material. They are always considered light armour. Wearing a helmet increases your AC by +1.

Shields are typically made from wood, metal, or fiberglass. Wielding a shield increases your unmodified Armour Class by 2. You can benefit from only one shield at a time.


Armour Properties

Armour Proficiency. Anyone can put on a suit of armour or strap a shield to an arm. Only those proficient in the armour’s use know how to wear it effectively, however. Your class gives you proficiency with certain types of armour. If you wear any piece of armour that you lack proficiency with, you have disadvantage on any ability check, saving throw, or attack roll that involves Strength or Dexterity.

Armour Class. Armour protects its wearer from attacks. The armour (and shield) you wear determines your base Armour Class. Some armour (such as light or medium arm and leg pieces) does not provide any benefit unless you are wearing multiple pieces of the same tier of armour.

Dexterity. Wearing some armour reduces the maximum Dexterity bonus the wielder can apply to their Armour Class (if you have one). The maximum Dexterity bonus allowed by armour without such penalties is treated as +5 (the cap for ability bonuses under normal circumstances).

A character who is wearing a complete set of matching armour (all light, all medium, or all heavy) and proficient with that armour ignores their Dexterity penalty.

Mobility. If the Armour table shows “Disadvantage” in the Mobility column, the wearer may have disadvantage on all Dexterity-based ability checks as well as Strength (Athletics) checks. The number of mobility impacting pieces that must be worn before the wearer suffers disadvantages is listed in brackets. (Note: if you prefer a less harsh approach, use D&D's default of just applying this disadvantage to Stealth).

Strength. Heavier armour interferes with the wearer’s ability to move quickly, stealthily, and freely. If the Armour table shows “Str 13” or “Str 15” in the Strength column for an armour type, wearing that armour reduces the wearer’s speed unless the wearer has a Strength score equal to or higher than the listed score. The wearer’s speed is reduced by 5 feet if they are equipped with one to three pieces of heavy armour, or by 10 feet if they are equipped with four or more pieces of heavy armour.

Piecemeal Armour

A character may wear pieces of armour from different categories. When piecemeal armour is worn:

  • 2 pieces of light arm and leg armour are equivalent to a single piece of medium arm or leg armour.
  • 1 piece of medium arm and leg armour is equivalent to 2 pieces of light arm and leg armour.
  • Thus, a wanderer wearing 1 piece of medium armour on their left arm and 2 pieces of light leg armour is effectively wearing either 4 pieces of light armour or 2 pieces of medium armour. Either way, that means they gain a +1 bonus to their AC.

A character combines the weight and negative modifiers of piecemeal armour worn in the same way that they would a complete set of the same armour. If even one piece of armour incurs Mobility disadvantage, it applies regardless of what other types of armour are worn.

Power Armour


X-01 Power Armour (Screenshot from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)

Power armour is heavy plating that is too bulky and heavy to be worn normally, but can be attached to mechanised power armour frames that bear the load. Power armour frames are also equipped with cushioning and other functions that protect the wearer from falls and other kinds of heavy impacts.

Power armour pieces and frames have no cost, as they are too rare and valuable to be available for purchase.

Like regular armour, power armour is divided up into six slots, and it is possible to wear an imcomplete or piecemeal suit of power armour on a frame.

A character can enter a power armour frame while wearing regular armour, but the features of that armour are immediately superceded by that of their power armour.

Power armour frames have the following effects when worn:

  • increase the wearerr’s effective Strength score by +4, and their Strength score can exceed 20 while wearing a frame.
  • the character’s maximum carrying capacity and lift/drag limits are doubled.
  • the wearer cannot benefit from their Dexterity bonus, but also doesn’t apply their Dexterity penalty.
  • the wearer has resistance to bludgeoning damage from falling or from something falling onto the wearer.
  • the wearer’s unarmed attacks deal 1d4 damage.

In addition to the features of the frame, power armour has the following statistics.

Hit Points. Each piece of power armour has a pool of hit points. When the wearer takes damage, their power armour loses its hit points first in the following order:

  1. Arms (starting with whichever has the least hit points if applicable, otherwise determined at random with a d6 roll where 1-3 means left and 4-6 means right).
  2. Legs (starting with whichever has the least hit points if applicable, otherwise determined at random with a d6 roll where 1-3 means left and 4-6 means right).
  3. Chest.
  4. Head.

Once a piece of power armour has lost all of its hit points, it is heavily damaged and must be repaired. The typical repair cost of a piece of power armour in coins or salvage is equal to its hit points divided by 5 (rounded up), and is shown in the Repair column of the Power Armour table.

Damage remaining after a piece loses all its hit points is carried over to the next piece or to the wearer.

Water Breathing. The helmets of power armour manufactured before the apocalypse (models A-D) are sealed and grant limited ability to breathe underwater, for as long as the air supply lasts (typically 5 minutes). Makshift power armour, such as the bolted together plating of raider power armour, isn’t watertight.


Getting Into and Out of Armour

Getting into armour is referred to as donning the armour, while taking it off is referred to as doffing the armour.

The time it takes to don or doff a piece of armour depends on the piece’s category, as shown in the Donning and Doffing Armour table. Donning and doffing an entire set of armour takes the combined time of all pieces to be donned or doffed.

Donning and Doffing Armour

Category
Don
Doff
Light
2 turns (12 seconds)
2 turns (12 seconds)
Medium
8 turns (48 seconds)
2 turns (12 seconds)
Heavy
16 turns (1 minute 36 seconds)
8 turns(48 seconds)

Synth Armour [Light Armour] (Screenshot from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)

Donning or doffing armour usually takes place outside of combat or other dangerous encounters (refer to the times in seconds and minutes). If armour is being donned or doffed at the same time a dangerous encounter takes place, the following rules apply:

  • When donning or doffing a piece of armour requires multiple turns, the character cannot attempt to do anything else on those turns, nor can they take reactions between their turns, otherwise the process is interrupted.
    If enough turns have occured to put on or retain partial armour before the process is interrupted, the character gains whatever benefits and incurs whatever penalties are associated with the number of pieces currently worn. Any additional turns taken are wasted, and the process of donning or doffing the remainder of the armour must begin again from zero.
    Donning or doffing armour is completed at the end of the final turn, meaning that the character could take a reaction during the same round as long as it occurs after their turn).

Provided power armour is already on its frame and the frame has been powered with a fusion cell, donning and doffing it is as simple as stepping into or out of the suit, though it takes a short time for the frame to open. It takes 2 turns (12 seconds) for a character to enter or exit the frame. Assembling a suit of power armour onto its frame takes an equivalent amount of time to donning or doffing heavy armour.

Armour and Shields

Armour
Cost
AC
Dexterity
Strength
Mobility
Weight
Light Armour
Arm Piece
8 caps
+ 1 per 4 pieces
1.5 lb.
Leg Piece
8 caps
+ 1 per 4 pieces
1.5 lb.
Chest Piece
15 caps
+1
3 lb.
Medium Armour
Arm Piece
15 caps
+ 1 per 2 pieces
Max Dex -1 per 2 pieces
4 lb.
Leg Piece
15 caps
+ 1 per 2 pieces
Max Dex -1 per 2 pieces
4 lb.
Chest Piece
30 caps
+3
Max Dex -1
8 lb.
Heavy Armour
Arm Piece
40 caps
+1
Max Dex -1
13
Disadvantage (2)
8 lb.
Leg Piece
40 caps
+1
Max Dex -1
13
Disadvantage (2)
8 lb.
Chest Piece
80 caps
+4
Max Dex -2
15
Disadvantage (1)
16 lb.
Helmet
Helmet
15 caps
+1
3 lb.
Shield
Shield
25 caps
+2
6 lb.

Sturdy Metal Armour [Medium Armour] (Screenshot from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)

Power Armour

Armour
Hit Points
Weight
Raider Power Armour
Arm Piece 10 16 lb.
Leg Piece 10 16 lb.
Chest Piece 20 22 lb.
Helmet 10 14 lb.
T-45 Power Armour
Arm Piece 15 15 lb.
Leg Piece 15 15 lb.
Chest Piece 30 20 lb.
Helmet 15 12 lb.
T-51 Power Armour
Arm Piece 20 15 lb.
Leg Piece 20 15 lb.
Chest Piece 40 20 lb.
Helmet 20 12 lb.
T-60 Power Armour
Arm Piece 25 15 lb.
Leg Piece 25 15 lb.
Chest Piece 50 20 lb.
Helmet 25 12 lb.
X-01 Power Armour
Arm Piece 30 15 lb.
Leg Piece 30 15 lb.
Chest Piece 60 20 lb.
Helmet 30 12 lb.


Armour Modifications

 
Light Armour
Medium Armour
Heavy Armour
Power Armour
Modification
Cost*
Weight
Cost*
Weight
Cost*
Weight
Cost
Weight
Material Modifications
Asbestos Lined
×2
+1.5 lb.
×2
+3 lb.
×2
+5 lb.
Heavy Build
×4
×1.5
×4
×1.5
×4
×1.5
Lead Lined
×2
+1.5 lb.
×2
+3 lb.
×2
+5 lb.
Lead Plating
+300 caps
+10 lb.
Light Build
×1.5
-0.5 lb.
×1.5
-1 lb.
×1.5
-2 lb.
Non-conducting
×2
+1.5 lb.
×2
+3 lb.
×2
+5 lb.
Thermal Lined
×2
+1.5 lb.
×2
+3 lb.
×2
+5 lb.
Titanium Plating
+500 caps
+10 lb.
Toughened
×2.5
+1.5 lb.
×2.5
+3 lb.
×2.5
+5 lb.
Winterized Coating
+300 caps
+10 lb.
Arm Modifications
Braced
+16 caps
+0.5 lb.
+30 caps
+1 lb.
+80 caps
+2 lb.
Brawling
+16 caps
+0.5 lb.
+30 caps
+1 lb.
+80 caps
+2 lb.
Claws
+80 caps
+3 lb.
Grappling Hook
+10 caps
+0.2 lb.
+10 caps
+0.2 lb.
+10 caps
+0.2 lb.
Hydraulic Fist
+80 caps
+3 lb.
Integrated Weapon
+10 caps +weapon
+weapon
+10 caps +weapon
+weapon
+10 caps +weapon
+weapon
Larceny Module
+200 caps
+0 lb.
+200 caps
+0 lb.
+200 caps
+0 lb.
Tesla Fist
+150 caps
+5 lb.
Chest Modifications
Blood Cleanser
—  
+150 caps
+5 lb.
Dense
+16 caps
+1.5 lb.
+30 caps  
+3 lb.
+80 caps
+5 lb.
Emergency Protocols
+300 caps
+5 lb.
Hacking Module
+200 caps
+0 lb.
+200 caps
+0 lb.
+200 caps
+0 lb.
Jet Pack
+500 caps
+10 lb.
Motion-assisted Servos
+200 caps
+5 lb.
Personal Stealth Assist Field
+500 caps
+5 lb.
Radiation Coils
+500 caps
+10 lb.
+500 caps
+10 lb.
+500 caps
+10 lb.
Resistance Field
+800 caps
+10 lb.
+800 caps
+10 lb.
+800 caps
+10 lb.
Sensor Array
+200 caps
+10 lb.
+200 caps
+10 lb.
+200 caps
+10 lb.
Spiked
+16 caps
+1.5 lb.
+30 caps  
+3 lb.
+80 caps
+5 lb.
Stealth Assist Field
Tesla Coils
500 caps
+10 lb.
500 caps
+10 lb.
500 caps
+10 lb.
+500 caps
+10 lb.
Helmet Modifications
Headlamp
+10 caps
+0.2 lb.
+10 caps
+0.2 lb.
Heavy
 
+20 caps
+2 lb.
Recon Sensors
+300 caps
+2 lb.
Leg Modifications
Calibrated Shocks
—  
+150 caps
+5 lb.
Cushioned 
+4 caps
+0.2 lb.
+8 caps 
+0.5 lb.
+20 caps
+1 lb.
Robot Legs
+30 caps
+30 caps
+30 caps
Thrusters
+80 caps
+80 caps
+80 caps
Treads
+60 caps
+60 caps
+60 caps
Muffled
+16 caps
+0.5 lb.
+15 caps
+1 lb.
+40 caps
+2 lb.
*In the case of multipliers to base item cost, round up where necessary.

Combat Armour [Medium Armour] (Screenshot from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)

Armour Modifications

The following lists describe modifications that can be applied to both armour and power armour.

A piece of armour or power armour can have up to two modifications: one from the material modifications list, and one from the specific list for the piece’s type.

When modifying armour, characters can usually choose from among the modifications that do not have “Robot” or “Power Armour” restrictions. Robots enjoy greater modification variety, and can also choose from “Robot” modifications. Finally,
When modifying power armour, only those modifications that specify “Power Armour” modifications are valid options.

The costs and weights of armour modifications are shown on the Modifications tables. In some cases the cost adjustment is to the armour piece’s base price is given as a multiplier. In these cases, the cost of the modification is that many times the piece’s base price in addition to the piece’s own cost. If multiplying the price results in a decimal point, always round up.

The Armour Modifications table shows the cost, weight, and other properties of the various upgrades available in the wasteland.


Material Modification Properties

The following modifications can be applied to all types of armour except helmets.

Asbestos Lined. The armour piece reduces any incoming energy or fire damage by 1.

Heavy Build. The armour is bulky and durable, granting the following benefits:

Light Arm/Leg: counts as 2 pieces of light armour or is treated as a piece of medium armour for the purpose of calculating AC.

Light Chest: +2 AC (instead of +1).

Medium Arm/Leg: counts as 2 pieces of medium armour or is treated as a piece of heavy armour for the purpose of calculating AC.

Chest: +4 AC (instead of +3).

Heavy Arm/Leg: increase AC by additional +1 for each two pieces worn (on top of their normal bonuses, for a total of +3 for two pieces and +6 for four).

Heavy Chest: +5 AC (instead of +4)

Lead Lined. The armour piece reduces incoming radiation damage by 1.

Lead Plating (Power Armour). While the piece is worn, reduce any incoming radiation damage by 5.

Light Build. The weight of the armour piece is reduced by 0.5 lb. (light), 1 lb. (medium or helmet), or 2 lb. (heavy).

Non-conducting. The armour piece reduces incoming lightning damage by 1.

Thermal Lined. The armour piece reduces incoming cold damage by 1.

Titanium Plating (Power Armour). While the piece is worn, reduce any incoming bludgeoning, piercing, or slashing damage by 5.

Toughened. The armour piece reduces incoming bludgeoning, piercing, or slashing damage by 1.

Winterized Coating (Power Armour). While the piece is worn, reduce any incoming energy or fire damage by 5.


Arm Piece Modification Properties

The following modifications can be applied to arm pieces only.

Braced. The armour piece reduces any incoming melee damage by 3.

Brawling. The armour piece increases your unarmed melee damage by 3.

Claws (Power Armour). While this modification is installed, on a successful hit with an unarmed attack the target must make a DC 10 Fortitude saving throw or take 1d4 slashing damage at the beginning of each of their turns. The target may repeat their saving throw at the end of each of their turns.

Grappling Hook (Robot/Power Armour). With this modification installed, you gain the benefit of a grappling hook and 50 feet of rope.

Hydraulic Fist (Power Armour). With this modification installed, the wielder’s unarmed attack deals 2d4 damage.

Integrated Weapon (Robot). Instead of a hand, you have a built-in one-handed weapon (a large robot can treat a two-handed weapon designed for medium creatures as though it were one-handed for this purpose). You cannot be disarmed of the integrated weapon. However, you cannot attempt any task that requires two hands. If you have two integrated weapons, you cannot attempt any task that requires hands at all.

Larceny Module (Robot). With this modification installed, gain proficiency in Lockpicking. You are always treated as though you have a set of lockpicks in your inventory.

Tesla Fists (Power Armour). While the arm piece is worn, on a successful hit with an unarmed attack deals an additional d4 lightning damage.


Chest Piece Modification Properties

The following modifications can be applied to chest pieces only.

Blood Cleanser (Power Armour). While the torso is worn, reduce the DC of chem addiction by 5.

Dense. The armour piece reduces any incoming damage taken as a result of an grenade, mine, or other explosion by one die of the smallest type dealt by the explosion.

Emergency Protocols (Power Armour). While the torso is worn, when your hit points are 20 or lower your speed increases 10 ft. and you gain resistance to all damage.

Hacking Module (Robot). With this modification installed, gain proficiency in Hacking. You act as your own personal computer, and are always assumed to have the necessary leads and interfaces.

Jet Pack (Power Armour). While the torso is worn, gain a fly speed of 30 feet. You can remain airborne for a maximum of three turns, landing (or falling) at the end of the third turn.

Motion-assisted Servos (Power Armour). While the torso is worn, your Strength ability score is increased by an additional +2.

Personal Stealth Assist Field (Power Armour). While the torso is worn, gain advantage on Dexterity (Stealth) rolls you make while remaining still or moving no more than fifteen feet per turn.

Radiation Coils (Robot). With this modification installed, as a bonus action on your turn you can activate the radiation coils. Adjacent creatures take 1d4 radiation damage at the start of every turn until they are no longer adjacent, or you turn the coils off as a bonus action.

Resistance Field (Robot). You project a field that diminishes the energy of incoming attacks. All alies within 15 feet of you reduce the damage taken from an attack by 3.

Sensor Array (Robot). With this modification installed, gain advantage on Wisdom (Perception) checks.

Spiked. The armour piece causes any creature the wearer grapples to take 1d4 piercing damage at the beginning of each ogf their turns.

Stealth Assist Field (Robot). With this modification installed, allies that remain within 15 feet of you increase their Dexterity (Stealth) check results by +2.

Tesla Coils (Power Armour/Robot). With this modification installed, as a bonus action on your turn you can activate the tesla coils. Adjacent creatures take 1d4 lightning damage at the start of every turn until they are no longer adjacent, or you turn the coils off as a bonus action.

Sturdy Synth Armour [Medium Armour] (Screenshot from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)


Head/Helmet Modifications

The following modifications can be applied to helmets only.

Headlamp. While the helmet is worn, gain the benefit of a flashlight.

Heavy. The helmet grants an additional +1 AC, but requires heavy armour proficiency.

Recon Sensors (Power Armour/Robot). With this modification installed, gain the benefit of a recon scope.


Leg Piece Modification Properties

Calibrated Shocks (Power Armour). While the leg piece is worn, the wearer’s carrying capacity is increased by 100 pounds.

Cushioned. The armour piece reduces falling damage by 3.

Hydraulic Frame (Robot). While this modification is installed, the robot’s carrying capacity is increased by 100 pounds.

Muffled. The armour piece grants a +2 bonus to Dexterity (Stealth) checks.

Robotic Legs (Robot). With this modification installed, you lose any special movement speed you might have had (such as a commbot’s hover), and instead have a 30 ft. movement speed.

This modification is treated as though it takes only one leg slot, but cannot be taken twice, nor can it be installed at the same time as either robotic legs or treads.

Thrusters (Robot). With this modification installed, your movement speed is replaced by a fly speed, though you cannot ascend higher than thirty feet above ground level.

This modification is treated as though it takes only one leg slot, but cannot be taken twice, nor can it be installed at the same time as either robotic legs or treads.

Treads (Robot). With this modification installed, increase your movement speed by 10 feet and gain advantage on any Dexterity (Acrobatics) ability checks rolled to retain footing on treacherous terrain. However, you also suffer disadvantage on Strength (Athletics) checks made to climb.

This modification is treated as though it takes only one leg slot, but cannot be taken twice, nor can it be installed at the same time as either robotic legs or thrusters.


Simple Armour Option

If you'd rather keep armour simple, you can use the alternative tables below and ignore the modification subsystem.

Simple Armour

Armour
Cost
AC
Dexterity
Strength
Mobility
Weight
Light Armour
47 caps
12
9 lb.
Medium Armour
90 caps
15
Max Dex +2
24 lb.
Heavy Armour
240 caps
18
Max Dex +0
15
Disadvantage
48 lb.
Helmet
15 caps
+1
3 lb.
Shield
25 caps
+2
6 lb.

Simple Power Armour

Armour
Hit Points
Weight
Raider Power Armour
70
68 lb.
T-45 Power Armour
105
62 lb.
T-51 Power Armour
140
62 lb.
T-60 Power Armour
175
62 lb.
X-01 Power Armour
210
62 lb.

Next Time

We're in the home stretch of our exploration of equipment. Next session we'll cover miscellaneous items that are available in the world of Fallout such as pipboys, talk briefly about how we might handle legendary modifications, and discuss the world's cap-based economy.

Over to You

What do you think of piecemeal armour, power armour, and the modifications? Let me know in the comments, or message me on twitter (@spilledale).