Wednesday, 9 August 2017

5e: Hacking the Game—Fallout, Part VIII

This week continues the series hacking D&D 5e for games played in the wasteland setting of Fallout hack series. Last week we looked at armour and power armour. This week is the final post on the topic of equipment and possessions.

We'll start by talking about currency and salvage. Then we're going to be taking a little detour to discuss some new rules to support addiction. The item tables and properties will follow, starting with chems, for no better reason than it makes some sense for them to immediately follow upon the heels of the addiction rules. After chems come food and beverages, devices, and finally a d100 table of trinkets.

If you're new to this series, you can find an index of all previous entries in the series here.

The Value of a Thing

One man’s trash is another man’s treasure, and that has never been truer than it is in the wastelands of America. An explorer may not have much need for a sheet of scrap metal, but if she can carry it back to a settlement they will almost certainly pay handsomely given that they can put it to a number of uses including repairs or as a crafting material.

Meanwhile, a set of pool balls with the three, seven, and eight balls missing might seem like a complete waste of space in the wanderer’s pack, until he goes to a bar in the next town he visits and finds out the owner is trying to piece together a complete set for his pool table.

8 Ball (3D model from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)


An art piece or curio from the Old World is usually almost valueless when compared to a practical item like a gun, but might be worth a few coins to someone interested in improving the decor of their shack. But to the right eccentric collector, such as a Ghoul who misses her Old World luxuries, a painting, a china dog, or even a particular brand of gum might be of significant worth, even priceless.

The principal of suppy and demand is alive and well in the wasteland. The sale value of any item, or of salvage, may very depending on the wants and needs of a potential purchaser. By the same token, it may be far more difficult to purchase supplies such as food if there is no surplus relative to the locals’ own needs.

Currency

While there are no governments to legitimise money nor functioning mints in which to make it, the descendants of nuclear survivors have found it convenient to build an economy of sorts using a commonly found legacy of the past. The currency of the new world is based on bottlecaps—the precise brand of the beverage doesn't matter.

Nuka Cola Bottlecap (3D model from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)


Alternatives to Currency

While wasteland traders like to deal with bottlecaps for convenience it is perfectly possible to deal with them for a lifetime without ever touching a cap.

Almost every trader will accept other items in place of caps. A whole caste of wasteland scavengers essentially make their living salvaging the junk of Old World ruins and giving what they find to a trader partner in exchange for food, water, and other essentials. Some traders actually prefer to deal in object trades rather than caps. This is because raiders also appreciate the convenience of caps, so unless they are truly desperate for supplies they may not attack a caravan with a reputation for carrying no currency.

Some wastelanders also find that ammunition makes for a great trade item, and ammo exchange is such a common practice that it effectively functions as a secondary economy. Bullets are fairly portable, and in effect also have “denominations” given they can be traded by the box-full. They always have inherent value, too—there is literally no one in the wasteland who doesn’t need bullets, so traders will always happily take them off a wastelander’s hands. It is therefore common practice to exchange unneeded ammunition for useful ammunition, bottlecaps, or other equipment and supplies.

Characters and Caps

Either convert the starting caps for a character's class directly from gold pieces to caps or set a standard amount for all characters that seems reasonable to you.

A player may purchase any item their character can afford at character creation, but the DM is within their rights to restrict any item. Following character creation, items may be unavailable due to the scarcity we previously discussed in part 2.


Salvage

Some items are given values in caps. Everything else—items that you might consider useless “junk”—is abstracted into a resource known as salvage.

Salvage represents an average value and weight for the myriad junk items scavengers might pick up while exploring the wasteland.

The value of a piece of salvage is generally the same as the value of one cap. However, the value of a cap is always constant (either “one”, or on rare occasions “zero” if a character encounters someone who won’t accept caps). On the other hand the value of salvage can fluctuate depending on local supply and demand. When there is a great need for salvage, each piece may be worth 2 or more caps. Where salvage is common, characters may need to trade 2 or more pieces for every cap that is returned.

Salvage can also be used as a raw material when crafting items. Typically, a character requires an equivalent amount of salvage to the item’s cap cost in order to make it.

Existing Mundane Items

Many of the items listed in the Player's Handbook are available in the wasteland. Players and DMs should simply use their common sense. As a rule, you can purchase items from the Player's Handbook as though their price in gold was their price in caps. Remember that 1 cap is the minimum currency in the Fallout setting. Therefore, when purchasing items with a smaller price you have two choices: buy in bulk (eg. buy multiples of that item or any combination of lesser valued items that are worth up to 1 cap), or if you have no interest in bulk purchasing you can pay simply pay 1 cap as though you were overcharged by that merchant or allowed them to "keep the change".

Med-X (3D model from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)




Addiction

Back in part 2 when I first interrupted my originally planned schedule with new thoughts I'd previously failed to consider, I mentioned that I may have to do so again. As it turns out, I didn't think about chem addiction at all! That's a rather big thing to miss. Fortunately, this isn't quite big enough subject to necessitate an entire article, and I can address mechanics to deal with addiction in this sidebar.

The basis of the rules is this: Whenever a character consumes an addictive substance, they must make a saving throw using an ability and against a DC determined by the substance in question. On a failed saving throw, the character gain a level of addiction, which is one of two new conditions along with Recovering Addict (see below).

New Condition: Addiction

Abuse of many substances can lead to a special condition called addiction. Addiction is measured in three levels.

A character can have multiple addictions, each with its own addiction level.

Addiction Effects

Level
Effect
1 Disadvantage on ability checks while in withdrawal. +2 to the DC of saving throws against addiction to this substance.
2 Disadvantage on attack rolls and saving throws while in withdrawal. +5 to the DC of saving throws against addiction to this substance. +2 to the DC of saving throws to resist giving in to addiction while in withdrawal.
3 Speed halved and cannot concentrate while in withdrawal. +10 to the DC of saving throws against addiction to this substance. +5 to the DC of saving throws to resist giving in to addiction while in withdrawal.

If an already addicted creature suffers another effect or fails a saving throw that results in addiction, its current level of addiction increases by the amount specified in the effect's description. A creature suffers the effect of its current level of addiction as well as all lower levels.

While addicted, a creature may feed its addiction by regularly taking the substance to which it has become addicted. It must take the substance at least once every 24 hours to avoid the effects of withdrawal caused by its addiction levels.

If a creature chooses not to take the addictive substance, or cannot do so, it enters withdrawal and suffers the withdrawal effects for its addiction level for a period of 7 days, or until the creature takes the addictive substance. If the creature is in possession of the substance or in a position to acquire some, it must make a saving throw using the ability the original check against addiction and a DC equal to 12 plus the modifier associated with their current addiction level. On a failed save, the creature does everything it can to feed its addiction.

A creature that manages to go 7 full days of withdrawal without feeding its addiction loses all levels of addiction for that particular substance, and gains the Recovering Addict condition.

New Condition: Recovering Addict

A recovering addict no longer has a physiological need to imbibe the substance to which they were addicted, but it retains a powerful psychological hold.

For a period of time equal to 3d4 months after gaining this condition, the character must make a DC 12 Wisdom saving throw against temptation whenever they come into contact with the substance to which they were addicted. On a failed save, they acquire and make use of the substance if they have the opportunity to do so and if doing so will not put them in immediate danger. They may repeat their saving throw after each long rest, and they succeed automatically if the substance becomes inaccessible.

The character has disadvantage on their saving throw if they are under stressful circumstances.

The Recovering Addict condition is removed after the months are up, but an addict is never truly "cured"— the GM may call for a temptation roll at their discretion any time the former addict is suffering or recently suffered conditions of extreme stress. In the world of Fallout, "extreme stress" should entail more than physical pain or dangerous encounters. Grief and extreme and long term pressure are two possible stressors.


Buffout (3D model from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)

Chems

Item Type
Cost
Addictol 125 caps
Antibiotics 75 caps
Buffout 120 caps
Calmex 100 caps
Daddy-O 50 caps
Day Tripper 100 caps
Jet 100 caps
Med-X 200 caps
Mentats 120 caps
Psycho 70 caps
Rad-X 40 caps
RadAway 80 caps
Stimpak 40 caps
X-Cell 300 caps

Chem Properties

The following are chems (otherwise known as drugs and performance enhancers) available in the world of Fallout:

Addictol. Taking Addictol as an action reduces the level of all a character's addictions by 1 and suppresses the effects of withdrawal for 24 hours. Addictol is not an addictive substance.

Antibiotics. Taking antibiotics as an action ends the effects of all diseases currently suffered by a character. Antibiotics are not an addictive substance.

Buffout. Taking Buffout as an action increases a character's AC by and Strength or Dexterity-based damage rolls by +2, and grants advantage on Strength, Dexterity, or Constitution-based attack rolls, checks, and saving throws. It also grants temporary hit points to the target equal to twice their character level. The effects of Buffout last for one minute.

Calmex. Taking Calmex as an action increases a character's AC and Dexterity or Wisdom-based damage rolls by +2, and grants advantage on Dexterity and Wisdom-based attack rolls, checks, and saving throws. The effects of Calmex last for one minute.

Daddy-O. Taking Daddy-O increases a character's AC and Dexterity or Intelligence-based damage rolls by +2, and grants advantage on Dexterity and Intelligence-based attack rolls, checks, and saving throws. The character has a -2 penalty on Charisma-based damage rolls (to a minimum of 1), and disadvantage on Charisma-based attack rolls, checks, and saving throws. The effects of Daddy-O last for one minute.

Day Tripper. Taking Day Tripper as an action increases a character's Charisma-based damage rolls by +2, and grants advantage on Charisma-based attack rolls, checks, and saving throws. The character has a -2 penalty on Strength-based damage rolls (to a minimum of 1), and disadvantage on Strength-based attack rolls, checks, and saving throws. If the optional Luck ability is used, the character also temporarily increases their Luck by +4 (increasing their bonus by +2 and therefore effectively granting them two Luck points to spend before the effects of the Day Tripper expire). If not, the character gains two points of inspiration, which do not count against the normal inspiration maximum. The effects of Day Tripper last for one minute.

Jet. Taking Jet as an action increases a character's AC by +2, grants advantage on Dexterity saving throws, and gains an additional action on its turns to make a single attack, use an Object action, Dash, Disengage, or Hide. The effects of Jet last for 30 seconds (5 rounds), after which a wave of lethargy sweeps over the user, preventing it from moving or taking actions until after its next turn.
Med-X. Taking Med-X as an action grants resistance to all damage, cures the poisoned condition, and immediately ends any ongoing poison damage. The effects of Med-X last for 30 seconds (5 rounds).

Mentats. Taking Mentats as an action increases a character's Intelligence, Wisdom, and Charisma-based damage rolls by +2, and grants advantage on Intelligence, Wisdom, and Charisma-based attack rolls, checks, and saving throws. The effects of Mentats last for one minute.

Psycho. Taking Psycho as an action increases a character's damage rolls by +4 and grants 10 temporary hit points at the beginning of each of the user's turns. The effects of Psycho last for 30 seconds (5 rounds).

Rad-X. Taking Rad-X as an action grants radiation resistance for an hour. Rad-X is not an addictive substance.

RadAway. Taking RadAway as an action removes two levels of radiation sickness. RadAway is not an addictive substance.

Stimpak. Using a Stimpak as an action on a living creature restores 6d4 hit points. Stimpaks are not an addictive substance.

X-Cell. Taking X-Cell as an action increases a character's AC and all their damage rolls by +2, and grants advantage on all attack rolls, checks, and saving throws. If the optional Luck ability is used, the character also temporarily increases their Luck by +4 (increasing their bonus by +2 and therefore effectively granting them two Luck points to spend before the effects of the X-Cell expire). If not, the character gains two points of inspiration, which do not count against the normal inspiration maximum. The effects of X-Cell last for one minute.

X-Cell (3D model from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)


Food and Drinks

You might still remember that way back in part 2 I talked about using a somewhat abstracted system for food and drink. The system I proposed divided forms of sustenance into the following categories: meals (like a brahmin steak), solid snacks (such as Fancy Lads Snack Games), drinks (water and other beverages that are equally hydrating), and liquid snacks (like Nuka Cola). Meals and drinks prevent the effects of starvation and dehydration respectively, while snacks temporarily reduce exhaustion levels and can be consumed in quantity to substitute for a proper meal or drink in a pinch. In addition, all types of food and beverage can be irradiated (which is typical), or not be tainted by radiation.

Because the system is abstracted, the specific types of food and drink available don't differ mechanically. As such, the table below simply groups example types of food and drink into the appropriate category. At the DM's option, however, they can add mechanical effects to specific and rare types of food or beverage, such as Nuka Victory or Mirelurk Queen meat.

Alcohol

The below table also includes alcohol, the effect of which is described in alcohol's entry under Food and Beverage Properties, below.

Gwinnett Stout (3D model from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)



Meals, Drinks, and Snacks

Item Type
Cost
Examples
Irradiated Meal 2-12 caps depending on quality/rarity. BlamCo Mac & CheeseCram, Egg (Any Variety), Fruit/Vegetable (Any Variety), InstaMash, Meat (Any Variety), Pork n' Beans, Salisbury Steak, Yum Yum Deviled Eggs
Pure Meal 15-40 caps depending on quality/rarity. Fresh Carrot, Fresh Corn, Fresh Melon, Field Ration/MRE, Fresh Mutfruit, Institute Food Packet, Perfectly Preserved Pie, Preserved (Any Packaged Food)
Irradiated Solid Snack 1-5 caps depending on quality/rarity. Bubblegum, Dandy Boy Apples, Fancy Lads Snack Cakes, Gum Drops, Potato Crisps, Sugar Bombs
Pure Solid Snack 10-20 caps depending on quality/rarity. Preserved (Any Packaged Snack Food)
Irradiated Drink 2-12 caps depending on quality/rarity. Dirty Water
Pure Drink 15-40 caps depending on quality/rarity. Institute Bottled Water, Purified Water, Refreshing Beverage
Irradiated Liquid Snack 1-5 caps depending on quality/rarity. Nuka Cola (Any Variety), Vim, Sunset Sarsaparilla
Pure Liquid Snack 10-20 caps depending on quality/rarity. Ice Cold Soda (Any Variety)
Alcohol Varies Bobrov's Best Moonshine, Beer/Ale (Any Variety), Wine, Spirit (Any Variety)


Food and Beverage Properties

Alcohol. A character can consume a number of alcoholic drinks (bottles of bear/cider/alcopops, glasses of wine, shots of spirits, etc.) equal to their Constitution modifier without significant effect. For each subsequent drink, they must make a Constitution saving throw beginning at DC 10 and increasing by 2 with each additional drink after the first save.
  • On the first failed save, the character becomes drunk and suffer disadvantage on ability checks, attack rolls, and saving throws.
  • On the second failed save, the character's speed is halved.
  • On the third failed save, the character falls unconscious for 3d4 hours.
The effects of drunkenness end after a long rest or a minimum of 8 hours unconsciousness, after which the character makes a DC 10 Constitution saving throw, becoming hungover until their next short rest on a failed save. While hungover, a creature has disadvantage on its ability checks.

Irradiated Drink. Make a DC 10 Constitution saving throw at the beggining of the next day following the drink (or drinks), gaining a level of radiation poisoning on a failed save.

Imbibe 2-3 drinks per day to avoid dehydration.

Nuka Cola (3D model from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)


Irradiated Meal. Make a DC 10 Constitution saving throw at the beggining of the next day following the meal (or meals), gaining a level of radiation poisoning on a failed save.

Eat 2-3 meals per day to avoid starvation.

Irradiated Liquid Snack. A creature may drink a liquid snack to temporarily recover a step of Exhaustion. Moves one step along the Exhaustion track again at the end of the current encounter. You may only gain the benefit of one snack per encounter.

Make a DC 10 Constitution saving throw at the beggining of the next day following the snack (or snacks), gaining a level of radiation poisoning on a failed save.

A creature may imbibe 3 liquid snacks to substitute for a drink.

Irradiated Solid Snack. A creature may eat a solid snack to temporarily recover a step of Exhaustion. Moves one step along the Exhaustion track again at the end of the current encounter. You may only gain the benefit of one snack per encounter.

Make a DC 10 Constitution saving throw at the beggining of the next day following the snack (or snacks), gaining a level of radiation poisoning on a failed save.

A creature may eat 3 solid snacks to substitute for a meal.

Pure Drink. A creature must imbibe 2-3 drinks per day to avoid dehydration.

Pure Meal. A creature must eat 2-3 meals per day to avoid starvation.

Pork 'n' Beans (3D model from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)


Pure Liquid Snack. A creature may drink a liquid snack to temporarily recover a step of Exhaustion. Moves one step along the Exhaustion track again at the end of the current encounter. You may only gain the benefit of one snack per encounter.

A creature may imbibe 3 liquid snacks to substitute for a drink.

Pure Solid Snack. A creature may eat a solid snack to temporarily recover a step of Exhaustion. Moves one step along the Exhaustion track again at the end of the current encounter. You may only gain the benefit of one snack per encounter.

A creature may eat 3 solid snacks to substitute for a meal.

Fancy Lads Snack Cakes, Irradiated (left) and Pure (right) (3D models from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)



Devices

Item Type
Cost
Pip-Boy
Robot Repair Kit
40 caps
Stealth Boy
150 caps


RobCo Industries Pip-Boy 3000 Mk. IV (left) and Stealth Boy (right) (3D models from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)


Device Properties

Pip-Boy. Depending on the model, a Pip-Boy is either a handheld or wrist-mounted personal computer running RobCo's Unified Operating System. It is capable of playing holodisks, tracking personal notes, and displaying logs and local area maps that are transferred from other machines. The Pip-Boy can be interfaced with all RobCo Industries computer terminal and robots in order to program or hack them. The interface is also universal with almost all other computers and robots built by other corporations of the pre-War United States, with only a few exceptions (read: at the DM's discretion).

Robot Repair Kit. Using a Robot Repait Kit as an action on a robot or turret restores 6d4 hit points.

Stealth Boy. Using a Stealth Boy as an action grants the invisible condition for 30 seconds (5 rounds).

Fallout Trinkets

Use the following table to replace the trinkets table from the Player's Handbook.

Grognak the Barbarian Comics (3D models from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)



Trinkets

d100 Roll
Trinket
1
The shrunken head of a feral ghoul.
2
A slightly used bar of soap.
3
A charm made from a Deathclaw's knucklebone. 
4
A battered copy of an edition of one of the following magazines: Tumblers Today or Locksmith's Reader.
5
A silver locket engraved with the initials "AD".
6
A souvenir magnet of Nuka-Cola's Cappy mascot.
7
A crude map inked onto a strip of Super Mutant skin.
8
A battered copy of a The Unstoppables comic book.
9
A hand-written fan script for a radio play entitled "The Silver Shroud Versus The Lascivious Libertine".
10
A sealed pack of RobCo branded pre-War playing cards.
11
A metal toy soldier with chipped paint.
12
A collectible baseball with a faded and illegibile signature.
13
A battered copy of an edition of True Police Stories magazine. 
14
A teddy bear in a little labcoat.
15
A copy of the Blast Radius board game with three of the original player tokens missing.
16
A pair of plastic "X-Ray Specs", that don't seem to do the job advertised.
17
A necklace made of nightstalker fangs. 
18
A Las Vegas Snow Globe.
19
A grisly amulet made of mole rat teeth, claws, and whiskers.
20
A false eyeball on a neck chain. 
21
A fancy hairbrush with a pretty floral pattern painted gold.
22
A stoppered bottle containing dark yellow liquid and labelled "Yaou Guai Urine - Aphrodisiac". 
23
The antenna of a PDQ-88b Securitron.
24
A roll of undeveloped ProSnap camera film.
25
A battered copy of an edition of one of the following magazines: Live and Love or Meeting People.
26
A holodisk journal written entirely in code.
27
A battered copy of a Silver Shroud comic book. 
28
A heavily creased pre-War photograph of a ragdoll cat.
29
A flip-lighter featuring a Protectron design. 
30
A battered copy of an edition of one of the following weapons magazines: Guns and Bullets, Duck and Cover, Future Weapons Today, Milsurp Review, or the Patriot's Cookbook.
31
A leather belt made from Deathclaw hide. 
32
A tattered and doodle-covered copy of Lying, Congressional Style.
33
An empty Vault-Tec Lunchbox. 
34
A carefully folded copy of a pre-war news paper.
35
A Nuka-Cola bottlecap-shaped bottle opener on a key chain. 
36
A safe deposit key to a mystery box in a mystery bank. 
37
A Jangles the Moon Monkey plush toy, unevenly restitched in several places.
38
A broken holodisk. 
39
A well-thumbed pre-war tabloid paper. 
40
A slightly bent silver fork. 
41
A battered copy of an edition of Hot Rodder magazine.
42
A broken RobCo Sentry Bot collectible model
43
A well-preserved codebook written in Chinese.
44
A slightly chipped china teacup.
45
A battered copy of an edition of Dean's Electronics magazine. 
46
A Brotherhood of Steel Holotog belonging to someone called Paladin Cole.
47
A piece of a cazadore's wing, preserved in a wooden box. 
48
A flip-lighter featuring a patriotic American flag.
49
A tarnished silver dollar.
50
A battered copy of an Astoundingly Awesome Tales comic book.
51
A baby rattle with a demonic face drawn on with permanent marker.
52
A dented coffee tin containing radbat guano.
53
A heavily thumbed and blood-spattered copy of an edition of the Wasteland Survival Guide.
54
A battered copy of one of the following: the U.S Covert Operations Manual or the Chinese Army Special Ops Training Manual.
55
A heavily creased pre-War photograph of a Pekingese dog.
56
A child's plastic Nuka-Cola watch, faded pink. 
57
An ugly purple plastic toy alien. 
58
A King, Queen, and Rook from a chess set, all carved from ivory.
59
A battered copy of an edition of Total Hack, Programmer's Digest, or similar.
60
A Nuka-Cola branded big gulp cup. 
61
One page of a longer musical score. 
62
A battered copy of an edition of Picket Fences magazine. 
63
A tiny ship impossibly trapped in a 50cl whiskey bottle. 
64
A plastic baseball bat with the words "talking stick" scrawled on it in permanent marker.
65
A heavily thumbed and grease-stained copy of an edition of Takes of a Junktown Jerky Vendor. 
66
A dented and torn copy of Pugilism Illustrated.
67
A battered copy of a ¡La Fantoma! comic book.
68
A shot glass with a frosted Vault-Tec logo.
69
A battered copy of an edition of one of the following magazines: The Massachusetts Surgical Journal, The D.C. Journal of Internal Medicine, or Today's Physician.
70
A decorative bowl carved from a human skull cap bone.
71
A plush sloth toy with a torn leg.
72
A broken RobCo Protectron collectible model.
73
An empty box featuring a design of a young boy performing a nuclear experiment and labelled "U-238 Atomatoys Energy Laboratory Kit".
74
A stainless steel eyelash curler.
75
A battered copy of an edition of Boxing Times magazine. 
76
A necklace made from pieces of polished radstag horn. 
77
A small jar filled with powdered ghoul bone. 
78
A Nuka-lele brand ukulele, painted with a colourful atomic explosion and with two of its strings missing. 
79
A colourfully stained copy of The Big Book of Science.
80
A child's wooden letter block with the letters B & Y.
81
A battered copy of an edition of La Coiffe magazine. 
82
A creased pre-War photograph of an attractive redhead.
83
A sheet of Grognak the Barbarian water transfers. 
84
An Unstoppables Cereal plastic decoder ring. 
85
A battered copy of an edition of Tesla Science magazine.
86
A jar of powder made from abraxo and dried radscorpion venom gland, sold as a treatment for athlete's foot. 
87
A boiled and varnished Deathclaw egg painted silver.
88
A trifold American flag in a wooden case.
89
A flip-lighter featuring an Unstoppables design.
90
A battered copy of an edition of Taboo Tattoos magazine.
91
A pre-War postcard from "Wilma" to "June", wishing the latter were with her in the pictured paradise, somewhere called Hawaii.
92
A chipped wooden yo-yo.
93
A battered copy of an edition of Lad's Life magazine.
94
A pristine pack of pre-War cigarettes. 
95
The hemispherical cap of a mini nuke. 
96
A battered copy of a Grognak the Barbarian comic book.
97
The Player's Handbook of a pre-War game called Vaults and Vampires, with many of its more obscure rules highlighted and their pages marked with colour-coded tabs.
98
A Super Mutant femur carved with tribal markings. 
99
A giddyup buttercup's front left leg.
100
An empty chemical canister marked "F.E.V."

Toy Alien (3D model from Fallout 4 © Bethesda Softworks)


Next Time

That's it for equipment! Next week, we'll be taking a look at Skills and Feats.

Over to You

What do you think of the rules for the abstract rules for salvage, food and drink? What about chems and addiction? How about the new trinkets table? Let me know in the comments, or message me on twitter (@spilledale).

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